Member

E gbeard@sowellgray.com

P (803) 231-7824
F (803) 231-7874
Grady focuses his practice on workers’ compensation, workers’ compensation mediation and appellate advocacy. He is a co-author of The Law of Workers’ Compensation Insurance in South Carolina, Sixth Edition, a comprehensive book analyzing this complex area of law. Grady is a Fellow in The College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers and is a member of the National Workers’ Compensation Defense Network. He serves on the Board of the South Carolina Workers' Compensation Educational Association, is active in the South Carolina Defense Trial Attorneys' Association and has been consistently recognized by Best Lawyers.
  • South Carolina Bar
  • Georgia Bar
  • U.S. District Court for the Middle and Northern Districts of Georgia
  • U.S. Courts of Appeal for the Fourth and Eleventh Circuits
  • U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina
  • Louisiana State University
  • Northwestern State University, B.S., summa cum laude, 1983
  • Emory University School of Law, J.D., 1987
  • American Bar Association
  • Richland County Bar Association
  • Defense Research Institute
  • South Carolina Workers Compensation Educational Association
  • South Carolina Defense Trial Attorneys’ Association
  • National Workers’ Compensation Defense Network
  • Supreme Court of South Carolina Certified Mediator
  • Panelist (with Bobby Stepp and Tina Cundari), Keep Calm and Appeal On: Appellate Practice in South Carolina, Sowell Gray CLE Series, Columbia, South Carolina (January 2013)
  • The Law of Workers’ Compensation Insurance in South Carolina (1992, Supplement;
1998, Second Edition; 2000, Supplement; 2003, Third Edition; 2004, Fourth Edition; 2008, Fifth Edition; 2012, Sixth Edition)
  • Fellow, The College of Workers’ Compensation Lawyers
  • Board of Directors, South Carolina Workers Compensation Educational Association
  • Vice-Chair, Workers’ Compensation Law Committee, South Carolina Defense 
Trial Attorneys Association
  • Former Co-Chair, Workers’ Compensation Section, South Carolina Defense 
Trial Attorneys Association
  • Advisory Board Member, Larson’s National Workers’ Compensation
  • Best Lawyers in America (Woodward/White, 2008-2017), Workers’ Compensation Law, Workers’ Compensation Law Laywer of the Year (2017)
  • Recipient, South Carolina Pro Bono Service Award
  • Nominee, South Carolina Pro Bono Lawyer of the Year (1990)
  • Carter v. Verizon Wireless, 757 S.E.2d 528 (S.C. Ct. App. 2014).  The South Carolina Court of Appeals agreed with the appellate panel that the claimant did not suffer a change of condition related to her knee injury.
  • Johnson v. Staffmark, 2014 WL 2580135 (S.C. Ct. App. 2014).  The South Carolina Court of Appeals affirmed the denial of benefits based on the claimant’s failure to prove a causal relationship between her employment and injuries to her foot and leg.
  • Bone v. U.S. Food Serv., 744 S.E.2d 552 (S.C. 2013).  The Supreme Court of South Carolina held that an order remanding the case to the commission for further proceedings does not constitute a final judgment and therefore is not immediately appealable.  The firm represented amicus curiae in this case.
  • Bentley v. Spartanburg Cty., 730 S.E.2d 2d 296 (S.C. 2012).  The Supreme Court of South Carolina held that a deputy sheriff’s post-traumatic stress disorder following a job-related fatal shooting of a suspect did not arise from an extraordinary and unusual condition of employment as required to be compensable mental injury.  The firm represented amicus curiae in this case.
  • Thigpen v. Lexington Med. Ctr., 2012 WL 10841349 (S.C. Ct. App. 2012).  The South Carolina Court of Appeals affirmed the commission’s determination that the claimant failed to demonstrate by medical evidence the existence of a direct causal connection between the repetitive activities of her work and her carpal tunnel syndrome.
  • Jones v. Georgia Pacific Corp., 586 S.E.2d 211 (S.C. 2003).  The Supreme Court of South Carolina held that the claimant’s subsequent back problems and surgeries were not directly and causally related to her work accident; the claim was barred because the claimant committed fraud in the employment application process; and the Americans with Disabilities Act does not trump the Cooper determination regarding when fraud bars a claimant’s attempt to collect workers’ compensation benefits.

GLB 2017 lawyer of the yearGLB 2017Best Lawyers - Grady Beardlorman-badge-200-bw